Magazine created by students of the Department of English and American Studies at Masaryk University.

Monthly archive

August 2015

All About That Game

in Other

By Šárka Panochová

DSC_0345 – kopieThere are new signs on the lawns tonight. As if nobody cared about tomorrow’s midterms anymore, the “Parking $10” signs ruthlessly replaced the names of politicians I had seen flying above the front yards. Tonight they are irrelevant. The usually empty streets of the campus and its surrounding neighborhoods are already packed with cars and yet there is still a long line of headlights desperately looking for empty spots. Tonight, Lawrencians who live within a mile radius around Allen Fieldhouse start making their vacation money on basketball fans by charging them for parking in their driveway. And I heard this was one of the unimportant games… Keep Reading

Stepping into Oxford Shoes

in Other

By Anna Formánková

Radcliffe Camera

Wet pavements. Red busses. BICYCLES. If you thought that a city centre without cars is a calm and silent city centre you would be terribly mistaken. The narrow lanes, broader streets, hidden passages: all the places are buzzing with life. From lectures into the libraries, a stop by the college to pick up the mail from the pidge, pop into the café for a quick snack and get back in time for the tute: the Oxford student never stops!

 

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External contributors wanted!

in News

To all people wishing to see their articles published in our magazine: Re:Views is currently looking for external contributors! Whether interested in writing a single article or seeking long-term cooperation, do not hesitate to contact us. Tell what you are interested in writing about and if you have had any experience working in a magazine.

Drop us a line on Facebook or write us an e-mail at re.views.magazine@gmail.com, we are looking forward to hearing from you!

The Pocket Chronicle of The Gypsywood Players

in Views

By Barbora Orlická and Tomáš Varga

 

It all began in 1965 in a small village called Cikháj when a nice lady from Scotland got an idea. She was none other than Jessie Kocmanová.  Jessie arrived in Czechoslovakia after 1945 with her husband, a Czech airman Vincenc Kocman. She became a member of the Department of English and American Studies and she was also involved in a theatre production at the British Council in Brno in 1947. After it closed down in 1948, she turned her attention elsewhere. Eventually, her interest in theatre found its practical outlet during one of the intensive English weeks in Cikháj where she decided to chase away boredom with the very first production of the Gypsywood Players (although the name was adopted only a year later). “So on the spot she just decided let’s do a play. So she picked out a five or six actors and found a text of some kind and they put on this play there,” recalls Don Sparling. As it turned out, it was the most remarkable thing she could have done.  Keep Reading

The (Brief) History of KAA

in Views

By Tereza Pavlíková and Blanka Šustrová


The Department of English and American Studies (KAA) has been here for more than 95 years. Following the establishment of the university in 1919, it was one of the founding departments of the Faculty of Arts. However, finding out the precise day of the founding of the English Department has proven to be a task more complicated than we imagined. There are no official records accessible. This we learned after checking a number of webpages, the whole Faculty of Arts library, and underneath the KAA couch. Failing in this task miserably, we decided to pay a visit to Don Sparling, who became a member of staff in 1977, to interview him in the hope that he would tell us where we could access the information we were so desperately seeking.
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Scottish Independence Referendum 2014

in Views

By Tereza Pavlíková, Martina Krénová, Markéta Šonková, Blanka Šustrová

As we are writing these articles, almost 4 months have passed since Scotland’s independence referendum (or Indyref, as it is sometimes adoringly nicknamed) took place. The heated discussion and strong emotions have cooled down and it has become possible to look at the referendum from a bigger distance. Which we did, and doing this, were trying to see the bigger picture. How was the situation leading up to it? How was the voting and what was it that swinged the scales in favour of Better Together? What are the outcomes? Are the promises being fulfilled and are Scottish people still interested in getting more independent? These were just some of the questions we asked ourselves and attempted to find answers for. Keep Reading

The Sleeper and the Spindle

in Reviews

By Lucie Horáková

At the end of 2014, Neil Gaiman published a new book, called The Sleeper and the Spindle, and many Gaiman fans rejoiced. Because some of them are also in our editorial board, the candidate for the spring Re:Views issue suggested itself. As a piece to review, The Sleeper and the Spindle is quite problematic – how to review a book only few pages long, whose message cannot be analysed without revealing a substantial part of the story? So instead of a classic review, the editorial board of Re:Views decided to share the views of three of its members about the book itself.

Sleeper and the Spindle Keep Reading

Far from the Madding Crowd

in Reviews

Drama from the Victorian England

by Sára Dobiášová

In Victorian England, the independent and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak, a sheep farmer; Frank Troy, a reckless Sergeant; and a prosperous and mature bachelor William Boldwood. The classic story, created by Thomas Hardy and published in 1874, is coming into the Czech cinemas in July 2015. Keep Reading

The Imitation Game: The Man & The Enigma

in Reviews

By Anna Formánková

One of the highly anticipated films of the year telling the story of one of the most unjustly mistreated man in the British history is coming into the cinemas. The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead role, arrives to uncover the life of the man who broke the Enigma code, Alan Turing.  Keep Reading

Outlander

in Reviews

by Lucie Horáková

 

When the interwebs announced that there is to be a new TV series called Outlander, taking place in 18th century Scotland, there seemed to be no reason whatsoever to pay it any closer attention. The series, produced by American cable network Starz, promised nothing out of ordinary. Based on a bestseller by Diana Gabaldon, it tells the story of Claire Beauchamp Randall, a nurse serving in WWII, who meets her husband in Inverness for their second honeymoon after five-year separation caused by the war. On the eve of Samhain some magic gets to work and Claire is transported back in time to the period of the Jacobite risings. Immediately after the unearthly experience, Claire is almost raped by a rough English soldier and saved by a handsome highlander who then makes use of her nursing skills.  Keep Reading

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