By Freya

Propaganda on Screen: Adapting Shakespeare’s Henry V

By Markéta Šonková

King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt
King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt Harry Payne, wikimedia commons, public domain CC0 1.0

It is no news that famous writings and cultural pieces have been, and continue to be used or interpreted differently than might have been their original literary purpose, often as a means to legitimize or explain actions of certain individual(s). This has been the case no matter what ideology or movement was holding the reins. However, not all kinds of content manipulation necessarily serve as a support of totalitarian regimes: they can also serve as a means to boost the morale of a war-tested nation, as is to be seen in Laurence Olivier’s 1944 Henry V movie adaptation or to send a political message in Kenneth Branagh’s 1989 film version. Truth be told, Henry V is an ambiguous text in today’s terms, allowing for various readings, which has been used several times by movie makers to pass on various messages while adapting one of the most famous pieces of British drama. Read more

Frankenstein is a YouTuber: On the Originality, Interactivity, and Contemporariness of Modern Adaptations of Classics

By Tereza Walsbergerová

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The Lizzie Bennet Diaries Courtesy of Pemberley Digital

Have you ever wondered where Elizabeth Bennet might work if she lived in the 21st century? What would Anne Shirley think of poetry slams if she was a college student in 2013 Canada? What would Dr. Frankenstein look like as a modern young woman? The internet has you covered. From all-time classics, such as Pride and Prejudice or Little Women, to slightly more obscure works, such as The Secret Garden, or even some tales from Greek mythology, people have decided to give their favourite heroes and heroines a makeover. This article attempts to get down to the nitty-gritty of modern adaptations of classic literary works on YouTube, focusing on their originality, interactivity, and contemporariness. Read more

Adapting Literature into Cakes

By Martina Krénová

 

Are you a bookworm and a passionate baker? Have you ever wondered if the food in literary works carries a deeper meaning? If so, there is no one to stop you from exploring the world of adapting literature into meals, biscuits, cakes… You might discover hidden treasures you would not necessarily find otherwise, and in addition you will enjoy the fruits of your labor. If you need inspiration, creators of the Literary Kitchen blog, Nicoletta Asciutto and Amy Smith, provide you with great recipes and insightful analyses of literary works of different genres and periods from the fourteenth century onwards.

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Welsh Cakes from Under Milk Wood. Photo courtesy of Nicoletta Asciuto.

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It Don’t Mean a Thing if It Ain’t Got That Swing

 

By Martina Krénová

 

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At the Savoy Cup 2016. Eric Esquivel, flickr.com, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

On hearing the phrase “swing dance”, many imagine old Hollywood movies with dancers dressed in sailor’s uniforms, which is not untrue of swing dance and music, but it is only a part of the swing era which in some form has survived to today. When looking into the history of swing dance and music, one realizes that it is so much more than a craze – it is a phenomenon that has overcome racial prejudice and inequality and connected millions of people.

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He Will Most Certainly Not Be Fine: Please Like Me as a Millennial’s Adaptation of Contemporary Australia

By Tereza Walsbergerová

 

Chuck Palahniuk is not by far the only one who realises that being in one’s twenties can be extremely tough. In fact, there is one comedian in Australia who based his entire livelihood on this notion and even created a TV show around it. Josh Thomas’ Please Like Me is about a young Melburnian named Josh who has to take care of his bipolar mother while struggling with being perpetually single, awkward, and generally lethargic. Having developed from Thomas’ stand-up routine of the same name, the show contains the lightness of the stand-up genre combined with raw honesty of a social drama – a fusion that sets the show up for instant success which has not quite yet reached mainstream audiences outside Australia. This article’s goal is to not only introduce and review Please Like Me for the Re:Views reader, but to also possibly get the reader to (please) like Please Like Me.

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US Presidential Elections 2016

Written by Radka Michaláková, Barbara Ocsovayová, Šárka Panochová

Edited by Šárka Panochová, Tereza Pavlíková

This year is Barack Obama’s last year in the office of President of the United States. It is also his eighth year as President which means that he cannot run for the office again. And this year, more than in the last few election cycles, some surprising faces have appeared in the race and are swinging the American political scene. The media have been covering the Presidential race for more than a year now. The discussion has penetrated everywhere, it seems almost impossible to avoid it. Re:Views brings you a series of articles about the candidates, the election process, and the campaigns as they unfold in the Spring of 2016. Read more

The Czech Sock in Bristol

 An Interview with Chris White

Written by Blanka Šustrová
Edited by Martina Krénová

Studying English language at university is not unusual these days for non-native speakers. But what if a young English-speaking man from Bristol decides to devote his college years to studying Czech language? It was a pleasure to ask Chris White what had led him to this decision, how he found the language and what the department of Czech studies in Bristol looked like.

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A Czech among (Czech) Texans

By Jan Beneš

„Howdy,“ calls out the professor, and the lecture room, filled with one hundred and fifty students dressed in maroon or donning a piece of clothing with “Aggies” on it, quickly responds with another “Howdy.” The class may now begin.

Welcome to College Station, Texas, a place you have probably never heard of. It is home to the Texas A&M University, the first public university in Texas, and 58,577 students called Aggies, who all use “Howdy” as an official greeting. The A&M campus is one of the largest in the United States, housing one of five largest public universities in the country. To top off the superlatives, the campus now boasts the largest American football stadium in the state of Texas with capacity over 100,000 seats. Texas A&M is a university with rich history, numerous traditions that make no sense to outsiders, and Czech connections. Read more