By Patricia

Post-Brexit Britain According to the Acting British Ambassador

By Markéta Šonková

 

Photo by Eva Růžičková

On March 29, Theresa May triggered Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. With such a step, she commenced a two-year process of the UK exiting the EU. This decision is also the result of last year’s referendum, known simply as Brexit, where the Leave campaign won by a slight, yet decided, margin. On April 11, the acting British Ambassador, Her Excellency Jan Thompson OBE, thanks to the invitation of the Student Section of IIPS, visited the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, and talked about Czech-UK relations and also about Brexit and the future of Scotland in the light of Brexit.

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“My posting to Prague is definitely the nicest place I have ever been posted to”: Interview with Her Excellency Jan Thompson OBE

HMA with her “embéčko”. Courtesy of the British Embassy in Prague, used with permission

By Markéta Šonková and Anna Formánková

Her Majesty’s Ambassador Jan Thompson has been in the Czech Republic for almost four years. Although she has spent lengthy periods in tough places, including war zones, during her diplomatic career, her job in Prague is no walk in the park either: she has to make sure that the relationship between the UK and the Czech Republic stays strong while Britain transits from an EU state into a non-member state. The topics of Markéta Šonková’s and Anna Formánková’s diplomatic interview were not only Brexit, but also Shakespeare, the position of a woman in diplomacy, as well as why there are cats at the British Embassy in Prague. Read more

MNMLSM

by Bára Skorkovská

The internet connects people, making the spread of new ideas and comparison of lifestyles easier than ever. But with all the new and exciting information comes the fear of being lost in the wide world, of being forgotten, and of not living life to the fullest. Many people spend the most productive parts of their lives working to acquire the money to enjoy the rest of it, only to discover that their life slipped between their fingers as they were working a dull job or spending money on useless items. Maybe because of this uncertainty and anxiety that affect mainly younger generations, the spread of alternative lifestyles is becoming a new trend. One of those is minimalism and the following article shall explain the art of letting go of the worthless to make space for things that really matter.

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Fanart Activism: Fan Participation as a Tool for Representation and Diversity Awareness

by Tereza Walsbergerová

Watching a film or a TV show, listening to a podcast, or reading a book, every once in awhile there comes a

Watching a horror movie – by Jay “tacogrande”

point when one thinks, “dang, I wonder if any character in this will ever look, feel or act like me.”. At that point, many turn to fanfiction – a great source of elaborate studies of minor and supporting characters as well as alternative scenarios or additional narratives that never “made it” into the original work. Often in tandem with fanfiction, one may also encounter fanart – certainly a more conspicuous kind of online fan participation. Not only is fanart more accessible to those who do not want to spend their evenings reading pages of text, but due to its visual character it has much bigger potential of becoming a special kind of sociopolitical activist tool by raising awareness about representation and diversity amongst fans of all ages from all over the world. This article focuses on this specific role of fanart by introducing three different artists and their works within three different American fandoms. Read more

Letter from Abroad: Greetings from Washington

By Natália Poláková

Bellingham downtown – Courtesy of Denisa Krásná

In the first place, I don’t want you to get confused. I am writing from Bellingham, in the State of Washington, home to Western Washington University, not Washington D.C., home to President Trump. This place rather wants to distance itself from Trump – but I will get to politics a bit later. Read more

Taking Pictures with a Matchbox

Matchobox camera (the sloth works as a shutter)

by Helena Brunnerová

That day I spent the morning photoshopping walls (which is a part of my job), and the afternoon and evening translating a text on the history of photography; at 11 p.m., as I watched white smoke rising from my battery charger, I felt inspired to try an alternative to digital. I wanted a reliable camera that does not need electricity or Photoshop. So I decided to build it myself.

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Art Makes Us Stronger

By Anna Jílková and Michaela Medveďová

When trying to answer a simple question – what is art – one may come to realize that this question is, indeed, very tricky. At least the search for the answer is. The definition varies from one person to another – what one considers to be art someone else may see as trumpery, and vice versa. However, what can be agreed on is that art comes in all shapes and sizes and can be found in the most common of things. We only need to open our eyes and look for it.

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Adaptation is characteristic of everything – of all life, all disciplines and all media: Interview with Kamilla Elliott

By Blanka Šustrová

 

Pietro Jeng, pexels.com(1), CC0 1.0(2)
Pietro Jeng, pexels.com, CC0 1.0

It would not be an exaggeration to claim that all of us have experienced some type of adaptation during our lifetime already. People often go to the cinema to watch movies based on their favourite books, play games based on their favourite movies and then read books based on the games. Adaptation is an organic process of information modification, of text shaping and media exploration. But what it is, exactly? Why it is good to stay unfaithful to the source material? And why is interdisciplinarity so important today? Professor Kamilla Elliott, a leading scholar in the field of adaptation studies, was kind enough to provide answers for all these questions and many more!

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Just a Bloke from Stratford: Upstart Crow Review

By Blanka Šustrová

Our hero lives in a small cottage somewhere in Warwickshire. He has to feed and clothe his old, grumpy parents together with his wife (eight years older) and their three children – a mopey teenager that only speaks in grunts and twins whose only interests are sweets. He commutes to London every week to work as an actor in a horribly understaffed company and when he snatches a bit of time for himself, he writes. Because, you know, he is a poet, an unappreciated genius of his time, an innovator of language… How is it possible that he is not famous yet? Well, his best friend steals his verses, his wife needs his humble wage as “she has a cottage to run”, his London servant Bottom makes fun of him but the worst of all – his nemesis publicly calls him an upstart crow.
This could be anyone’s story, so why not William Shakespeare’s?

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