From Other

In the Land of the Armed

By Jan Beneš

Cocks Not Glocks demonstration at UT on August 24, 2016
Cocks Not Glocks demonstration at UT on August 24, 2016

I don’t always receive emails inviting me to go to an active shooter training, but when I do, I attend it. (Un)fortunately, there are no actual guns or any weapons involved in this kind of training; rather, it is a dry presentation by the campus police at Texas A&M, where I am currently studying, on how to act in case of an active-shooter situation on campus. Rather than being a hands-on practice session on how to neutralize a threat, the seminar involves a brief, yet effective presentation of a triad of strategic principles in case of attack: run, hide, fight. Have an escape route, evacuate regardless of others’ decision to stay behind – that is the run part. Locking yourself in your office, staying out of the shooter’s line of sight, barricading the door, and spreading people around the room are sound hiding strategies. Fighting back, though – that is where the presentation turns into sobering reality. During the Q&A at the end, where educators around me ask how to protect not only themselves, but their students from a potential, but all-too-real threat of an active shooter on campus, the presenter acknowledges that fighting back, and not coming out alive, might be your only option. After all, as one of the Powerpoint slides states: the aim is to prepare both mentally and physically for what might come. Read more

Brexit: Post-Referendum Sentiments

By Natália Poláková

In the last issue, Re: Views brought its readers detailed coverage of the Brexit campaign as an indecisive contest between the ‘inners’ and the ‘outers’. The referendum, held on June 23 2016, turned out to be a surprising exercise in democracy for Britain.  Some 52 per cent voted to leave the European Union and steer the country toward a new destination. Its captain has already hopped off the sinking ship and the new one has seized the wheel. Where Britons are heading now, nobody exactly knows. Read more

Artificial Swear Words

How Can We Swear Without Swearing?

By Pavel Peléšek

 

Many children worldwide have been told to “stop watching that filth!” by their parents after a dirty word has been uttered on screen. Many times a writer has received the draft of their new novel back from the publishers riddled with censorship notes whenever a character decided to speak their mind about a particularly nasty situation. There is, however a certain creative way to overcome this problem and that is to adapt. Read more

It Don’t Mean a Thing if It Ain’t Got That Swing

 

By Martina Krénová

 

Picture 5
At the Savoy Cup 2016. Eric Esquivel, flickr.com, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

On hearing the phrase “swing dance”, many imagine old Hollywood movies with dancers dressed in sailor’s uniforms, which is not untrue of swing dance and music, but it is only a part of the swing era which in some form has survived to today. When looking into the history of swing dance and music, one realizes that it is so much more than a craze – it is a phenomenon that has overcome racial prejudice and inequality and connected millions of people.

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A Czech among (Czech) Texans

By Jan Beneš

„Howdy,“ calls out the professor, and the lecture room, filled with one hundred and fifty students dressed in maroon or donning a piece of clothing with “Aggies” on it, quickly responds with another “Howdy.” The class may now begin.

Welcome to College Station, Texas, a place you have probably never heard of. It is home to the Texas A&M University, the first public university in Texas, and 58,577 students called Aggies, who all use “Howdy” as an official greeting. The A&M campus is one of the largest in the United States, housing one of five largest public universities in the country. To top off the superlatives, the campus now boasts the largest American football stadium in the state of Texas with capacity over 100,000 seats. Texas A&M is a university with rich history, numerous traditions that make no sense to outsiders, and Czech connections. Read more

Podcast: THE Medium for the Millennial Generation

by Tereza Walsbergerová

 

In the last five years the popularity of radio podcasts had risen to the point where even Stephen Colbert acknowledged them on CBS’s The Late Show. What is so special about this seemingly mysterious and underground medium and why one may consider it the ideal medium for the millennial generation? This article offers a brief introduction to the ins and outs of podcast with a focus on radio podcasting in America. Read more

Language and Quebec: the Fixation

by Melissa Upton

As language students, we are familiar with the impact that language has on cultures and peoples. We are fluent in how it has shaped history and continue to learn how it affects our own generations. As a  resident who was born and raised in Quebec, I am no stranger to this ever growing conversation and  have tried to capture if nothing but a brief portion of it below.

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All About That Game

By Šárka Panochová

DSC_0345 – kopieThere are new signs on the lawns tonight. As if nobody cared about tomorrow’s midterms anymore, the “Parking $10” signs ruthlessly replaced the names of politicians I had seen flying above the front yards. Tonight they are irrelevant. The usually empty streets of the campus and its surrounding neighborhoods are already packed with cars and yet there is still a long line of headlights desperately looking for empty spots. Tonight, Lawrencians who live within a mile radius around Allen Fieldhouse start making their vacation money on basketball fans by charging them for parking in their driveway. And I heard this was one of the unimportant games… Read more

Stepping into Oxford Shoes

By Anna Formánková

Radcliffe Camera

Wet pavements. Red busses. BICYCLES. If you thought that a city centre without cars is a calm and silent city centre you would be terribly mistaken. The narrow lanes, broader streets, hidden passages: all the places are buzzing with life. From lectures into the libraries, a stop by the college to pick up the mail from the pidge, pop into the café for a quick snack and get back in time for the tute: the Oxford student never stops!

 

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