Magazine created by students of the Department of English and American Studies at Masaryk University.

Translating for Children Means Greater Responsibility

in Interviews/Views

An Interview with Filip Krajník, the Czech Translator of the Darcy Burdock Series

by Martina Krénová

edited by Blanka Šustrová

 

You are the translator of Laura Dockrill’s Darcy Burdock series. Why did you choose to translate a series for pre-teen girls? Tell us the backstory.

Kniha 4
© Laura Dockrill; Corgi ,Transworld Publishers, The Random House Group

Actually, it wasn’t me who made the choice. I’d love to say that the book chose me or something like that to create a bit of cheap dramatic effect, but the truth is that I was chosen by the Czech publisher. More than two years ago, I stopped by the offices of Argo publishing house in Prague to discuss some translation I was doing for them at the time and decided to make use of the opportunity and say hi to Alena Pokorná, the editor in chief of Argo’s children’s department. She has an absolutely wonderful office in the attic of the building, with many bookshelves filled with children’s books – one of the most beautiful workplaces I’ve ever seen. I don’t actually remember what happened there, but I do recall myself leaving Alena’s office about half an hour later with a little blue book with some weird girl and a sheep on the cover which I promised to translate without actually having read a single word of it. When I arrived home, I opened the book and after a couple of pages my thoughts were like, “Oh my God! I’ve just made the biggest, fattest mistake in my life! I can’t translate this – this is a book for GIRLS. Narrated by a girl. Who is ten and paints her fingernails different colours. And yes, she’s totally CRAZY!” But then I learned that Darcy, the book’s eponymous narrator, hated mushrooms – which I despise as well – so I decided to give it a try. (Laughs.) Keep Reading

Bond: The Man Fleming Always Wanted to Be

in Reviews

By Anna Formánková

Three years after the 50th anniversary of James Bond on screen, the franchise continues with what is expected to be the most successful Bond movie yet: SPECTRE. The embodiment of what Ian Fleming always desired to become returns on silver screen in the 24th instalment, the fourth adventure starring Daniel Craig as the iconic MI6 agent.

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Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond

in Reviews

by Anna Formánková

Ian Fleming, the man who introduced the world to one of the biggest British heroes: Bond. James Bond. Though best known as a successful author of the Bond novels, Fleming drew inspiration for 007’s adventures from his own experience which he gained while working at the British Naval Intelligence Division. His life before Bond, including the WWII espionage period, is now uncovered in the four-part dramatisation ‘Fleming’, starring Dominic Cooper as the iconic personage.

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Robert Olen Butler: Severance

in Reviews

By Lucie Horáková

Severance 1
Book designed by Brooke Johnson for Chronicle Books; Photo by Dominika Sirná

Butler’s Severance is an unexpected take on the format of a short story collection. It contains sixty one very short texts that all adhere to some rather specific rules. Each short story has exactly 240 words. Why? Because Butler used some interesting facts as his starting point. First, “After decapitation, the human head is believed to remain in a state of consciousness for one and one-half minutes.” And second: “In a heightened state of emotion, people speak at the rate of 160 words per minute.” This suggests that a decapitated head should be able to deliver a 240-word-long inner soliloquy and this is the content of Butler’s short story collection – sixty one 240-word-long inner monologues inside various severed heads. Keep Reading

Language and Quebec: the Fixation

in Other

by Melissa Upton

As language students, we are familiar with the impact that language has on cultures and peoples. We are fluent in how it has shaped history and continue to learn how it affects our own generations. As a  resident who was born and raised in Quebec, I am no stranger to this ever growing conversation and  have tried to capture if nothing but a brief portion of it below.

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All About That Game

in Other

By Šárka Panochová

DSC_0345 – kopieThere are new signs on the lawns tonight. As if nobody cared about tomorrow’s midterms anymore, the “Parking $10” signs ruthlessly replaced the names of politicians I had seen flying above the front yards. Tonight they are irrelevant. The usually empty streets of the campus and its surrounding neighborhoods are already packed with cars and yet there is still a long line of headlights desperately looking for empty spots. Tonight, Lawrencians who live within a mile radius around Allen Fieldhouse start making their vacation money on basketball fans by charging them for parking in their driveway. And I heard this was one of the unimportant games… Keep Reading

Stepping into Oxford Shoes

in Other

By Anna Formánková

Radcliffe Camera

Wet pavements. Red busses. BICYCLES. If you thought that a city centre without cars is a calm and silent city centre you would be terribly mistaken. The narrow lanes, broader streets, hidden passages: all the places are buzzing with life. From lectures into the libraries, a stop by the college to pick up the mail from the pidge, pop into the café for a quick snack and get back in time for the tute: the Oxford student never stops!

 

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External contributors wanted!

in News

To all people wishing to see their articles published in our magazine: Re:Views is currently looking for external contributors! Whether interested in writing a single article or seeking long-term cooperation, do not hesitate to contact us. Tell what you are interested in writing about and if you have had any experience working in a magazine.

Drop us a line on Facebook or write us an e-mail at re.views.magazine@gmail.com, we are looking forward to hearing from you!

The Pocket Chronicle of The Gypsywood Players

in Views

By Barbora Orlická and Tomáš Varga

 

It all began in 1965 in a small village called Cikháj when a nice lady from Scotland got an idea. She was none other than Jessie Kocmanová.  Jessie arrived in Czechoslovakia after 1945 with her husband, a Czech airman Vincenc Kocman. She became a member of the Department of English and American Studies and she was also involved in a theatre production at the British Council in Brno in 1947. After it closed down in 1948, she turned her attention elsewhere. Eventually, her interest in theatre found its practical outlet during one of the intensive English weeks in Cikháj where she decided to chase away boredom with the very first production of the Gypsywood Players (although the name was adopted only a year later). “So on the spot she just decided let’s do a play. So she picked out a five or six actors and found a text of some kind and they put on this play there,” recalls Don Sparling. As it turned out, it was the most remarkable thing she could have done.  Keep Reading

The (Brief) History of KAA

in Views

By Tereza Pavlíková and Blanka Šustrová


The Department of English and American Studies (KAA) has been here for more than 95 years. Following the establishment of the university in 1919, it was one of the founding departments of the Faculty of Arts. However, finding out the precise day of the founding of the English Department has proven to be a task more complicated than we imagined. There are no official records accessible. This we learned after checking a number of webpages, the whole Faculty of Arts library, and underneath the KAA couch. Failing in this task miserably, we decided to pay a visit to Don Sparling, who became a member of staff in 1977, to interview him in the hope that he would tell us where we could access the information we were so desperately seeking.
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